'Vampire' murderer pleads for softer jail time

October 28, 2007 (news.com.au / Peter Hansen) -- Convicted murderer Tracey Wigginton, who calls herself a vampire, began new Supreme Court action last week, protesting against her high-security classification. She wants to do her life sentence in the softer conditions of a prison farm.


Her application to the court last week sought declarations that recent decisions to classify her as a high-security prisoner and to house her back at the higher-security Brisbane Women's Correctional Centre were unlawful.

Now 42, she has been in custody since October 1989 when she and three other women were involved in the murder of Edward Baldock, 47, at West End in Brisbane.

The court heard that they lured him into a car at night outside the Caledonian Club at Kangaroo Point. They drove to a park on the banks of the Brisbane River and promised him sex.

Wigginton stabbed Baldock 27 times and drank his blood.

They were quickly caught when detectives found a credit card belonging to one of the women in one of his shoes.

Wigginton was transferred back to the women's prison in June last year after allegedly assaulting another prisoner and a prison guard.

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'Vampire killer' finally walks free after 22 years behind bars

January 12, 2012 (The Australian / Rosanne Barrett and Sean Parnell) -- Notorious "vampire killer" Tracey Wigginton was surprised by Brisbane's "huge skyline" on her release from jail after 22 years yesterday.  The convicted murderer quietly walked free from the low-security Numinbah Correctional Centre yesterday morning on 31 parole conditions. However, she will not be required to undergo electronic monitoring.

In 1991, Wigginton pleaded guilty to the stabbing murder of Edward Baldock, 47, before sensational claims of her hypnotic powers, belief in the occult and a "need to feed" on her victim's blood were raised by her co-accused in a later trial.

Wigginton, aged 24, and three other women lured Baldock into a car and took him to a riverside park in West End. Wigginton then stabbed him 27 times.

Prisoner advocate Debbie Kilroy, who has known Wigginton since she went to jail, said she would put her reputation on Wigginton's successful reintegration into society. Ms Kilroy collected Wigginton from jail and said the first thing the newly freed prisoner noticed was the "huge skyline".

The Australian revealed last month that Wigginton, 46, would be released on parole after her application to the independent Queensland Parole Board was granted on her eighth attempt.  As part of her parole conditions she must have psychiatric, psychological, medical treatment and counselling as directed.

Her conditions include a prohibition on contacting -- directly or indirectly -- Baldock's family, her co-offenders or the media without the prior approval of the parole board.

She must not receive payment or benefit from her offence and must disclose to her parole officer any "intimate relationship".

Wigginton loses bid to get out of jail

March 5, 2010 (AAP) -- INFAMOUS "vampire killer" Tracey Wigginton today lost a Supreme Court bid that would pave the way her release on parole after having already served 20 years behind bars. Brisbane Supreme Court Juduge Glenn Martin this morning dismissed Wigginton's application to overturn the Queensland Parole Board's decision to refuse her release on parole, Brisbane's Courier-Mail reported. Justice Martin also rejected Wigginton's challenge of a decision by Queensland's Department of Corrective Services that effectively blocks her from being transferred back to the low-security Numinbah Correctional Centre, 115km south of Brisbane. Wigginton has already served 20 years of life sentence for the 1989 murder of council worker Edward Baldock, 47. Lawyers for Wigginton in December argued Wigginton was in such frail health it was nigh on impossible for her to harm anyone if released on parole. Barrister Josh Fenton, for Wigginton, told the court the convicted killer was suffering from a chronic and debilitating back condition and a knee injury and required crutches to remain mobile. He said it was hard to believe his 44-year-old client would ever be physically capable of killing someone again with a knife. The court was told Wigginton had been placed in a no-win situation which required her to spend at least six months in a low-security facility such as Numinbah before she could be granted release on parole. However, Mr Fenton said, Wigginton's crippling ailments required treatment not available at the Numinbah facility. "A woman who suffers from (these conditions) is highly unlikely to commit such a crime (as that on Baldock) again," he said. Wigginton, who is classified as a low-security prisoner and has been in jail since January 1991, was one of four women who lured Baldock into a car at Kangaroo Point. He was driven to West End where Wigginton stabbed him 27 times and drank his blood. Wigginton has been eligible for parole since 2002, but her latest application was denied in July last year.

'Vampire' killer Tracey Wigginton seeks release

December 11, 2009 (Courier Mail / Tony Keim) -- "LESBIAN vampire killer" Tracey Wigginton was in such frail health it was nigh on impossible for her to harm anyone if released on parole, a court heard. Lawyers for Wigginton, who has been in jail for the past 20 years, yesterday told the Brisbane Supreme Court the convicted killer was suffering from a chronic and debilitating back condition and a knee injury and required crutches to remain mobile. Barrister Josh Fenton, for Wigginton, said it was hard to believe his 44-year-old client would ever be physically capable of killing someone again with a knife. Wigginton, who is serving a life sentence for the 1989 murder of council worker Edward Baldock, 47, has launched legal action against the Queensland Parole Board to overturn its decision to refuse to release her on parole. She is also challenging a decision by Queensland's Department of Corrective Services that effectively blocks her from being transferred back to the low-security Numinbah Correctional Centre, 115km south of Brisbane. Mr Fenton said Wigginton has been placed in a no-win "Catch 22" situation which required her to spend at least six months in a low-security facility such as Numinbah before she could be granted release on parole. However, he said Wigginton's crippling ailments required treatment not available at the Numinbah facility. "A woman who suffers from (these conditions) is highly unlikely to commit such a crime (as that on Baldock) again," Mr Fenton said. Wigginton, who is classified as a low-security prisoner and has been in jail since January 1991, was one of four women who lured Baldock into a car at Kangaroo Point. He was driven to West End where Wigginton stabbed him 27 times and drank his blood. Wigginton has been eligible for parole since 2002, but her latest application was denied in July this year. She was moved from Numinbah prison farm back to Brisbane Women's Correctional Centre in 2006 after being accused of assaulting another prisoner. Justice Glenn Martin has reserved his decision. Outside court, Sisters Inside prisoner advocate and solicitor Debbie Kilroy said she believed Wigginton was fully rehabilitated. Ms Kilroy had offered to allow the convicted killer to live with her if released.

interesting, this one's a

interesting, this one's a bit different from some of the other psyco vampire people articles. very interresting.....and why 27 times? talk about superstision...

Brisbane's "Vampire Killer" to be freed from jail

April 14, 2008 (The Courier-Mail / Robyn Ironside) -- One of two women jailed for life over Brisbane's shocking vampire murder is to be released back into the community.

The Queensland Parole Board has approved the gradual release of Lisa Ptaschinski, 41, who was found guilty of the 1989 murder of Brisbane City Council worker Edward Baldock.

In 1991 she was sentenced to life imprisonment - joining former lesbian lover Tracey Wigginton - who pleaded guilty to the murder.

The court heard Ptaschinski and two other women lured the drunken Baldock into their car at Kangaroo Point for the purpose of fulfilling Wigginton's "need to feed".

They then drove to Orleigh Park at West End where Wigginton stabbed him 27 times and drank his blood.

Rowers found Baldock's naked body near the South Brisbane Rowing Club the next day and police discovered a cash card bearing Wigginton's name in one of his shoes.

Of the two other women involved, Kim Jervis was sentenced to 18 years jail for manslaughter - later reduced to 12 years - and Tracey Waugh was acquitted after her defence barrister argued she had played no active role in the murder and had tried to stop Jervis from taking part.

Since 1998, Ptaschinski has been held at the Numinbah Prison Farm on the Gold Coast and under the resettlement leave program, she will be allowed a maximum of 12 hours leave every two months for six months.

A Queensland Corrective Services spokesman said reports Ptaschinski's co-accused, self-proclaimed vampire Tracey Wigginton was being released were "110 per cent untrue"

 

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From the Library

As the 20th century evolved, rational man turned to science to explain mythology that had pervaded for thousands of years. How could a man be mistaken for a vampire? How could someone appear to have been the victim of a vampire attack? Science, in time, came back with answers that may surprise you.Anemia
A million fancies strike you when you hear the name: Nosferatu!N O S F E R A T Udoes not die!What do you expect of the first showing of this great work?Aren't you afraid? - Men must die. But legend has it that a vampire, Nosferatu, 'der Untote' (the Undead), lives on men's blood! You want to see a symphony of horror? You may expect more. Be careful. Nosferatu is not just fun, not something to be taken lightly. Once more: beware.- Publicity for Nosferatu in the German magazine Buhne und Film, 1922  

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