Theater: New Plays in Manhattan (TIME: 1927) [excerpts]

 

Theater: New Plays in Manhattan (TIME: Monday, October 17, 1927)

Dracula. A quarter century ago, a book (Bram Stoker's Dracula) dealt with a gruesome being, dead five centuries, who haunted maidens' boudoirs in the shape of a bat, to drink their blood. So horrible were its beastly visions that many a maid fell helpless with hysterics; mothers banned the book, after reading it secretly themselves, and fainting. This book is now a play, packed grimly with cursing madmen, open graves, the scream of dogs, the shadow of Beath.

The world, or a least that particle of it which is represented in the audience at Manhattan theatres, has come a long way in 25 years. Now maidens can see grisly horror, and withdraw between the acts to smoke a cigaret and talk calmly of their minor vices. But when they are in the theatre they can scarcely resist Dracula; nor can their stalwart escorts. It is a chamber of horrors to raise the most jaded hair. Viewed technically it has its faults of mechanics and an occasional unevenness of interest. It is well but by no means perfectly played. Yet the material is morbidly magnificent. And of course it is all perfectly silly.

Alexander Woollcott, New York World: "Ye who have fits prepare to throw them now."

John Anderson, New York Evening Post: "See it and creep."

 

 


 

Theater: New Plays in Manhattan (TIME: Monday, October 31, 1927)

Best Plays in Manhattan. These are the plays which, in the light of metropolitan criticism, seem most important.

MELODRAMA: DRACULA - In which the dead live and the living destroy death.

 

 


 

The Theatre: New Plays in Manhattan: November 7, 1927

Best Plays in Manhattan. These are the plays which, in the light of metropolitan criticism, seem most important.

MELODRAMA: DRACULA - The murder of a ghoul.

 

 


 

The Theatre: New Plays in Manhattan: November 21, 1927

MELODRAMA: DRACULA - Green lights, goose flesh, ghouls, moans.

 

 

 

Fanged Films

USA, 2002
Blood Shot
USA, 1914

From the Library

As the 20th century evolved, rational man turned to science to explain mythology that had pervaded for thousands of years. How could a man be mistaken for a vampire? How could someone appear to have been the victim of a vampire attack? Science, in time, came back with answers that may surprise you.Anemia
A million fancies strike you when you hear the name: Nosferatu!N O S F E R A T Udoes not die!What do you expect of the first showing of this great work?Aren't you afraid? - Men must die. But legend has it that a vampire, Nosferatu, 'der Untote' (the Undead), lives on men's blood! You want to see a symphony of horror? You may expect more. Be careful. Nosferatu is not just fun, not something to be taken lightly. Once more: beware.- Publicity for Nosferatu in the German magazine Buhne und Film, 1922  

Drawn to Vamps?

Vol. 1 No. 3
Part 3
Vol. 1 No. 16
Vigil Among the Vampires