Under the Fang

Rating: 
4
Under the Fang
Review by The Princess of Cups, submitted on 16-Jul-1991

This collection of stories certainly had me reconsidering my fondness for vampires. The result has been a certain disorientation on my part. It's much like over-eating, in that something I usually enjoy has now left me feeling mildly ill. It took a great deal of writing skill for me to actually be "sickened" by vampires. Usually when I encounter bad vampires--they are bad only in quality of characterization--one dimensional, fanged monsters facing one dimensional handsome heroes and wilting heroines. Not so with this collection of stories; it's very high quality.

Most shocking of all was for me to see Saint-Germain in this environment. While part of me was chuckling in delight to see Charnas and Yarbro each bring their memorable vampires into the story, a part of me was horrified.

You see, I've "known" Saint-Germain longer than I've known most of my friends. And I like him better than most of my family. :-[ (laugh, I'm being facetious.) Although he was being his typically moral self, I just found it disturbing to see him in and among the other more beastly vamps. As for our dear Dr. Weyland ... he too is his normal self. I fear that Saint-Germain expects much more from him than I ever did.

BTW, I very much enjoyed the cultural set-up of this particular story. Compared to some of the darker companion stories, it was almost utopian.

Fanged Films

USA, 1980
Drak Pack
Malaysia, 2004
Pontianak Harum Sedap Malam

From the Library

As the 20th century evolved, rational man turned to science to explain mythology that had pervaded for thousands of years. How could a man be mistaken for a vampire? How could someone appear to have been the victim of a vampire attack? Science, in time, came back with answers that may surprise you.Anemia
A million fancies strike you when you hear the name: Nosferatu!N O S F E R A T Udoes not die!What do you expect of the first showing of this great work?Aren't you afraid? - Men must die. But legend has it that a vampire, Nosferatu, 'der Untote' (the Undead), lives on men's blood! You want to see a symphony of horror? You may expect more. Be careful. Nosferatu is not just fun, not something to be taken lightly. Once more: beware.- Publicity for Nosferatu in the German magazine Buhne und Film, 1922  

Drawn to Vamps?

Vol. 1 No. 3
Architecture & Morality, Part Three
Vol. 1 No. 43
The Lonely Vampire